Social monogamy in a territorial salamander

@article{Gillette2000SocialMI,
  title={Social monogamy in a territorial salamander},
  author={Jennifer R. Gillette and R. Jaeger and Megan G. Peterson},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2000},
  volume={59},
  pages={1241-1250}
}
Social monogamy, which does not necessarily imply mating or genetic monogamy, is important in the formation of male-female pair associations. We operationally define social monogamy as occurring when two heterosexual adults, exclusive of kin-directed behaviour, direct significantly less aggression and significantly more submission towards each other, and/or spend significantly more time associating with each other relative to other adult heterosexual conspecifics. Long-term pair associations (i… Expand

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