Social mediation of sexually selected ornamentation and steroid hormone levels in male junglefowl

@article{Parker2002SocialMO,
  title={Social mediation of sexually selected ornamentation and steroid hormone levels in male junglefowl},
  author={Timothy H. Parker and Rosemary Knapp and Jonathan A. Rosenfield},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2002},
  volume={64},
  pages={291-298}
}
Abstract Honest signals in sexual selection may be maintained by a variety of mechanisms. Comb size in male red junglefowl, Gallus gallus , a well-known predictor of female mate choice, is mediated by health and condition. Social status has also been shown to mediate comb size. To determine whether hormones related to male dominance behaviour might be related to social status and comb size, we monitored changes in plasma levels of testosterone and corticosterone following manipulation of social… 
Dynamic phenotypic correlates of social status and mating effort in male and female red junglefowl, Gallus gallus
TLDR
The notion that sex‐specific costs associated with social status and mating effort result in differential, sex-specific dynamics of phenotypic change in male and female phenotypes is supported.
Dominant male red junglefowl (Gallus gallus) test the dominance status of other males
TLDR
This is the first demonstration that aggression of dominant male birds is directed at other males based on the display of an ornament known to be attractive to females.
NO EVIDENCE FOR ADAPTIVE DIFFERENTIAL SEX ALLOCATION IN RED JUNGLEFOWL (GALLUS GALLUS)
TLDR
Red Junglefowl females may not bias the sex ratio of their brood in response to either their own condition or the attractiveness of the males with whom they copulate, suggesting the importance of choosing the correct methods of sex ratio analysis.
Seizing the Opportunity: Subordinate Male Fowl Respond Rapidly to Variation in Social Context
TLDR
It is concluded that both the proximity and social status of nearby males affects, either directly or indirectly, the courtship efforts of subordinate male fowl.
Female mating preferences in red junglefowl: a meta-analysis
TLDR
Meta-analyses show that when all mate choice experiments involving combs are analysed together, female preference is significantly related to male comb morphology, which is consistent with current understanding of the signalling value of the comb of male red junglefowl.
Ejaculate testosterone levels affect maternal investment in red junglefowl (Gallus gallus gallus)
TLDR
Lower circulating and higher ejaculate T concentrations in subordinate red junglefowl males compared to dominant males, suggestive of an adaptive trade-off in T allocation to circulation and their ejaculate, and a new form of interaction between a cryptic paternal trait and a maternal effect that may be widespread in the animal kingdom are found.
Personality Predicts Social Dominance in Male Domestic Fowl
TLDR
It is found that males that more quickly explored a novel arena, or remained vigilant for a longer period following the playback of a warning call were more likely to obtain a dominant position, and several behavioural traits independently play a role in the establishment of social status, which in turn can have implications for the reproductive success of different personality types.
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References

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TLDR
It is suggested that males of different quality pay different costs to maintain both ornamentation and immune defense in captive red jungle fowl.
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TLDR
Comb characteristics are facultative and are probably good indicators of individual condition, suggesting that females using these traits to distinguish among males could be obtaining good genes for their offspring.
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TLDR
The method of choice used by females could affect the speed with which correlations develop between the genes for male traits and genes for female preferences, and sexual selection for good genes may be more consistent with an absolute than a relative method of female choice.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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