Social influences on foraging behavior in young nonhuman primates: Learning what, where, and how to eat

@article{Rapaport2008SocialIO,
  title={Social influences on foraging behavior in young nonhuman primates: Learning what, where, and how to eat},
  author={Lisa G. Rapaport and Gillian R Brown},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2008},
  volume={17}
}
Human infants rely on social interactions to acquire food‐related information. 1 , 2 Adults actively teach children about food through culturally diverse feeding practices. Characteristics we share with the other primates, such as complex diets, highly social lives, and extended juvenile periods, suggest that social learning may be important during ontogeny throughout the order. Although all young primates typically pay attention to feeding adults, great apes and callitrichids, in particular… Expand
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