Social exclusion causes self-defeating behavior.

@article{Twenge2002SocialEC,
  title={Social exclusion causes self-defeating behavior.},
  author={Jean M. Twenge and Kathleen R. Catanese and Roy F. Baumeister},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2002},
  volume={83 3},
  pages={
          606-15
        }
}
Four experiments tested the idea that social exclusion leads to (unintentionally) self-defeating behavior. Exclusion was manipulated by telling some people that they were likely to end up alone later in life. This randomly assigned feedback caused people to take irrational, self-defeating risks (Experiments 1 and 2), choose unhealthy, rather than healthy, behaviors (Experiment 3), and procrastinate longer with pleasurable activities rather than practicing for an upcoming test (Experiment 4). A… 

Social exclusion decreases prosocial behavior.

Social exclusion caused a substantial reduction in prosocial behavior and the implication is that rejection temporarily interferes with emotional responses, thereby impairing the capacity for empathic understanding of others and as a result, any inclination to help or cooperate with them is undermined.

Social exclusion impairs self-regulation.

Rejected people are capable of self-regulation but are normally disinclined to make the effort, and decrements in self- regulation can be eliminated by offering a cash incentive or increasing self-awareness.

Effects of Disposition and Self-Regulation on Self-Defeating Behavior

Results suggest that to avoid problems of adaptation, it is wise for psychologists to promote social self-efficacy, incremental implicit theories of ability, and positive emotion in groups threatened with social exclusion.

It's the thought that counts: The role of hostile cognition in shaping aggressive responses to social exclusion.

Experiments tested the hypothesis that social exclusion increases the inclination to perceive neutral information as hostile, which has implications for aggression, and found hostile cognitive bias among excluded people.

Social exclusion and the deconstructed state: time perception, meaninglessness, lethargy, lack of emotion, and self-awareness.

The authors hypothesize that socially excluded individuals enter a defensive state of cognitive deconstruction that avoids meaningful thought, emotion, and self-awareness, and is characterized by

The effects of social-exclusion inducing stereotype threat

Stereotype threat occurs when one may feel as if they are confirming or representing a selfcharacteristic or a negative stereotype of one’s group. Social exclusion has been shown to threaten the need

Effects of social exclusion on cognitive processes: anticipated aloneness reduces intelligent thought.

The effects were specific to social exclusion, as participants who received predictions of future nonsocial misfortunes (accidents and injuries) performed well on the cognitive tests and appeared to involve reductions in both speed (effort) and accuracy.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 53 REFERENCES

If you can't join them, beat them: effects of social exclusion on aggressive behavior.

Responses were specific to social exclusion (as opposed to other misfortunes) and were not mediated by emotion.

Why do bad moods increase self-defeating behavior? Emotion, risk taking, and self-regulation.

It is shown that the risky tendencies are limited to unpleasant moods accompanied by high arousal; neither sadness nor neutral arousal resulted in destructive risk taking.

Esteem Threat, Self-Regulatory Breakdown, and Emotional Distress as Factors in Self-Defeating Behavior

Patterns of human self-defeating or self-destructive behavior are examined in relation to several hypothesized causes. Threatened egotism appears to be a major, pervasive cause: Self-defeating

Effects of social exclusion on cognitive processes: anticipated aloneness reduces intelligent thought.

The effects were specific to social exclusion, as participants who received predictions of future nonsocial misfortunes (accidents and injuries) performed well on the cognitive tests and appeared to involve reductions in both speed (effort) and accuracy.

Emotional distress regulation takes precedence over impulse control: if you feel bad, do it!

Three experiments found that believing that one's bad mood was frozen (unchangeable) eliminated the tendency to eat fattening snacks, seek immediate gratification, and engage in frivolous procrastination during emotional distress.

Ego depletion: is the active self a limited resource?

The results suggest that the self's capacity for active volition is limited and that a range of seemingly different, unrelated acts share a common resource.

Point-Counterpoints: Anxiety and Social Exclusion

This article elaborates a view of anxiety as deriving from a basic human need to belong to social groups. Anxiety is seen as a pervasive and possibly an innately prepared form of distress that arises

Responses to Social Exclusion: Social Anxiety, Jealousy, Loneliness, Depression, and Low Self-Esteem

Baumeister and Tice's (this issue) social exclusion theory of anxiety proposes that a primary source of anxiety is perceived exclusion from important social groups. This article elaborates the basic

Suicide as escape from self.

Suicide is analyzed in terms of motivations to escape from aversive self-awareness, a state of cognitive deconstruction that brings irrationality and disinhibition, making drastic measures seem acceptable.

Losing Control: How and Why People Fail at Self-Regulation

Basic Issues: Introduction: Self-Regulation Failure in Social and Theoretical Context. General Patterns and Mechanisms of Self-Regulation Failure. Controlling Thoughts, Feelings, and Actions: Task
...