Social drive and the evolution of primate hearing

@article{Ramsier2012SocialDA,
  title={Social drive and the evolution of primate hearing},
  author={Marissa A. Ramsier and Andrew J. Cunningham and James J. Finneran and Nathaniel J. Dominy},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2012},
  volume={367},
  pages={1860 - 1868}
}
The structure and function of primate communication have attracted much attention, and vocal signals, in particular, have been studied in detail. As a general rule, larger social groups emit more types of vocal signals, including those conveying the presence of specific types of predators. The adaptive advantages of receiving and responding to alarm calls are expected to exert a selective pressure on the auditory system. Yet, the comparative biology of primate hearing is limited to select… 

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