Social disparities across the continuum of colorectal cancer: a systematic review

@article{Palmer2004SocialDA,
  title={Social disparities across the continuum of colorectal cancer: a systematic review},
  author={Richard C Palmer and Eric C. Schneider},
  journal={Cancer Causes \& Control},
  year={2004},
  volume={16},
  pages={55-61}
}
Abstract.Objective:The purpose of this review is to evaluate the published literature to assess social inequalities in colorectal cancer using the ‘cancer disparities grid.’ Methods: Three computerized databases were searched from January 1990 to January 2004 to identify published English language articles that collected data from study participants living in the United States. Abstracts were reviewed and articles that dealt with social inequality and colorectal cancer were selected. A total of… 
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