Social cost of tail loss in Uta stansburiana: lizard tails as status-signalling badges

@article{Fox1990SocialCO,
  title={Social cost of tail loss in Uta stansburiana: lizard tails as status-signalling badges},
  author={Stanley F. Fox and Nancy A. Heger and Linda S. Delay},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1990},
  volume={39},
  pages={549-554}
}
Abstract Individuals of many lizard species lose tails to escape predation, but incur later costs, including reduced social status. Since size relates strongly to social rank in lizards, experiments were devised to separate effects of reduced size from other aspects of tail loss on social status following loss of tail. Tail removal from dominant subadult side-blotched lizards, Uta stansburiana, lowered social status in dyadic encounters. Artificial restoration of tail length restored social… Expand
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