Social complexity influences brain investment and neural operation costs in ants

@article{Kamhi2016SocialCI,
  title={Social complexity influences brain investment and neural operation costs in ants},
  author={J. Frances Kamhi and Wulfila Gronenberg and Simon K A Robson and James F. A. Traniello},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2016},
  volume={283}
}
The metabolic expense of producing and operating neural tissue required for adaptive behaviour is considered a significant selective force in brain evolution. In primates, brain size correlates positively with group size, presumably owing to the greater cognitive demands of complex social relationships in large societies. Social complexity in eusocial insects is also associated with large groups, as well as collective intelligence and division of labour among sterile workers. However… 

Figures from this paper

Worker brain development and colony organization in ants: Does division of labor influence neuroplasticity?
TLDR
Comparison of macroscopic and cellular neuroanatomy in two ant sister clades with striking contrasts in worker morphological differentiation and colony‐level social organization suggests changes in the mushroom body with age are associated with division of labor, and therefore social complexity, in ants.
Social Complexity and Brain Evolution: Comparative Analysis of Modularity and Integration in Ant Brain Organization
TLDR
It is found that colony size and social organization, key measures of social complexity, were only weakly correlated with brain modularity in these formicine ants, suggesting that brain organization may be shaped by the divergent life histories of the two study species.
Behavioral performance requirements for division of labor influence adaptive brain mosaicism in a socially complex ant
TLDR
Investment in multi-sensory integration and motor requirements for task performance was estimated to be greatest for media workers whose leaf-harvesting repertoire involves the most diverse and demanding sensory and motor processes, including plant discrimination, leaf cutting, and fragment transportation.
Division of labor and brain evolution in insect societies: Neurobiology of extreme specialization in the turtle ant Cephalotes varians
Strongly polyphenic social insects provide excellent models to examine the neurobiological basis of division of labor. Turtle ants, Cephalotes varians, have distinct minor worker, soldier, and
Behavior, brain, and morphology in a complex insect society: trait integration and social evolution in the exceptionally polymorphic ant Pheidole rhea
TLDR
The early branching position of P. rhea in the phylogeny of Pheidole and patterns of worker phenotypic plasticity suggest this species exhibits an ancestral state of sociobiological and neurobiological organization that served as a ground plan for diversification in this ecologically dominant ant genus.
Brain evolution in social insects: advocating for the comparative approach
TLDR
It is argued that measuring the role of sociality in brain evolution will benefit from attending to recent advances in neuroethology and adopting existing phylogenetic comparative methods employed in analysis of non-neural traits.
Brain Size, Metabolism, and Social Evolution
TLDR
Using ants as eusocial insect exemplars, an analysis of brain evolution encompassing metabolism, brain size, and neuroarchitecture is proposed to understand how these traits scale with body size and correlate with social behavior.
Behavioral performance and division of labor influence brain mosaicism in the leafcutter ant Atta cephalotes.
TLDR
The hypothesis that variation in task performance influences selection for mosaic brain structure, the independent evolution of proportions of the brain composed of different neuropils, is supported.
Socioecology and Evolutionary Neurobiology of Predatory Ants
TLDR
The socioecology of predatory ants and its influence on neuroanatomy is discussed, which provides the opportunity to separate the relative roles of diet and colony size and brain structure, and offer diverse novel systems to understand adaptive brain mosaicism and the neuronal regulation of predatory behavior.
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 96 REFERENCES
Distributed cognition and social brains: reductions in mushroom body investment accompanied the origins of sociality in wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)
TLDR
These patterns suggest the strongest changes in brain investment—a reduction in central processing brain regions—accompanied the evolutionary origins of eusociality in Vespidae, a modification of social brain models.
Specialization and group size: brain and behavioural correlates of colony size in ants lacking morphological castes
TLDR
The relationship between colony size and brain region volume was task-dependent, supporting the task specialization hypothesis and suggesting that workers specialized in defence may have reduced learning abilities relative to leaf-ants.
Social brains and behavior: past and present
TLDR
The study suggests that diet, colony size, and worker size may influence tradeoffs between individual and collective cognition and the evolution of brain size and division of labor in eusocial insects such as ants.
Evolution of brain size in class-based societies of fungus-growing ants (Attini)
Social complexity, diet, and brain evolution: modeling the effects of colony size, worker size, brain size, and foraging behavior on colony fitness in ants
TLDR
The study suggests that diet, colony size, and worker size may influence tradeoffs between individual and collective cognition and the evolution of brain size and division of labor in eusocial insects such as ants.
An Exploration of the Social Brain Hypothesis in Insects
TLDR
It is argued that future work aiming to understand how animal behavior, cognition, and brains are shaped by the environment should focus on brain functions and identify neural circuitry correlates of social tasks, not only brain sizes.
Social bonds in birds are associated with brain size and contingent on the correlated evolution of life‐history and increased parental investment
TLDR
It is shown that large relative brain size in birds is associated with pair-bond strength, itself a likely consequence of cooperation and negotiation between partners under high levels of parental investment, and that the evolution of both traits is contingent on biparental care.
Are Bigger Brains Better?
Neuroanatomical and Morphological Trait Clusters in the Ant Genus Pheidole: Evidence for Modularity and Integration in Brain Structure
TLDR
Examination of integration and modularity in brain organization and its developmental patterning in three ecotypical Pheidole species identified two trait clusters, the first involving olfaction and social information processing and the second composed of brain regions regulating nonolfactory sensorimotor functions.
Evolution in the Social Brain
TLDR
It is suggested that it may have been the particular demands of the more intense forms of pairbonding that was the critical factor that triggered this evolutionary development.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...