Social bonds predict future cooperation in male Barbary macaques, Macaca sylvanus

@article{Berghnel2011SocialBP,
  title={Social bonds predict future cooperation in male Barbary macaques, Macaca sylvanus
},
  author={Andreas Bergh{\"a}nel and J. Ostner and Uta Schr{\"o}der and O. Sch{\"u}lke},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2011},
  volume={81},
  pages={1109-1116}
}
Social bonds have been construed as mental representations mediating social interactions among individuals. It is problematic, however, to differentiate this mechanism from others that assume more direct exchanges and interchanges of behaviour such as reciprocity, market effects or mutualism. We used naturally occurring shifts in rates and patterns of social interactions among male Barbary macaques to test whether affiliation in the nonmating season predicts coalition formation in the mating… Expand
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