Social benefits of luxury brands as costly signals of wealth and status

@article{Nelissen2011SocialBO,
  title={Social benefits of luxury brands as costly signals of wealth and status},
  author={R. M. A. Nelissen and M. H. C. Meijers},
  journal={European Public Law},
  year={2011}
}
  • R. M. A. Nelissen, M. H. C. Meijers
  • Published 2011
  • Business, Sociology
  • European Public Law
  • Drawing from costly signaling theory, we predicted that luxury consumption enhances status and produces benefits in social interactions. Across seven experiments, displays of luxury — manipulated through brand labels on clothes — elicited different kinds of preferential treatment, which even resulted in financial benefits to people who engaged in conspicuous consumption. Furthermore, we tested preconditions in which the beneficial consequences of conspicuous consumption may arise and determined… CONTINUE READING
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