Social behaviors of all-male proboscis monkeys when joined by females

@article{Murai2004SocialBO,
  title={Social behaviors of all-male proboscis monkeys when joined by females},
  author={Tadahiro Murai},
  journal={Ecological Research},
  year={2004},
  volume={19},
  pages={451-454}
}
  • T. Murai
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Ecological Research
In a riverine forest along the Menanggul River, which is a tributary of the Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Malaysia, I observed an all-male group of proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) consisting of 27–30 (mean: 28.8) individuals. This large size of the all-male group seems to be attributed to habitat fragmentation because of the expansion of oil palm plantations. A few females joined this all-male group. Sub-adult females copulated with subadult or large juvenile males. Since the mean male tenure… Expand

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