Social Feedback to Infants' Babbling Facilitates Rapid Phonological Learning

@article{Goldstein2008SocialFT,
  title={Social Feedback to Infants' Babbling Facilitates Rapid Phonological Learning},
  author={Michael H. Goldstein and Jennifer A. Schwade},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={19},
  pages={515 - 523}
}
Infants' prelinguistic vocalizations are rarely considered relevant for communicative development. As a result, there are few studies of mechanisms underlying developmental changes in prelinguistic vocal production. Here we report the first evidence that caregivers'speech to babbling infants provides crucial, real-time guidance to the development of prelinguistic vocalizations. Mothers of 9.5-month-old infants were instructed to provide models of vocal production timed to be either contingent… Expand

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