Social Engagement and Attachment

@article{Porges2003SocialEA,
  title={Social Engagement and Attachment},
  author={Stephen W. Porges},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={1008}
}
  • S. Porges
  • Published 1 December 2003
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Abstract: This article focuses on the importance of social engagement and the behavioral and neurophysiological mechanisms that allow individuals to reduce psychological and physical distance. A model of social engagement derived from the Polyvagal Theory is presented. The model emphasizes phylogeny as an organizing principle and includes the following points: (1) there are well‐defined neural circuits to support social engagement behaviors and the defensive strategies of fight, flight, and… 

Oxytocin and social affiliation in humans

  • R. Feldman
  • Psychology, Biology
    Hormones and Behavior
  • 2012

Reciprocal influences between body and brain in the perception and expression of affect : A polyvagal perspective

Introduction Emotions, affect regulation, and interpersonal social behavior are psychological processes that describe basic human experiences in response to events, environmental challenges and

Reciprocal influences between body and brain in the perception and expression of affect: A polyvagal perspective

Introduction Emotions, affect regulation, and interpersonal social behavior are psychological processes that describe basic human experiences in response to events, environmental challenges and

The social neuroscience of attachment

Attachment theory, developed by the British psychoanalyst John Bowlby and his American colleague Mary Ainsworth (Bowlby, Attachment and loss, 1969; Ainsworth et al., Patterns of attachment, 1978),

Social Bonding and Attachment

Polyvagal Theory: A Science of Safety

  • S. Porges
  • Psychology
    Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
  • 2022
Contemporary strategies for health and wellbeing fail our biological needs by not acknowledging that feelings of safety emerge from internal physiological states regulated by the autonomic nervous

Oxytocin receptor gene and parental bonding modulate prefrontal responses to cries: a NIRS Study

The results highlight that higher genetic susceptibility (G/G homozygous) to familiar context and positive early life interactions modulate more optimal neural responses to general social cues, in terms of promptness to action.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES

LOVE: AN EMERGENT PROPERTY OF THE MAMMALIAN AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM

The polyvagal theory: phylogenetic substrates of a social nervous system.

  • S. Porges
  • Biology, Psychology
    International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • 2001

Emotion: An Evolutionary By‐Product of the Neural Regulation of the Autonomic Nervous System a

  • S. Porges
  • Biology, Psychology
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1997
The polyvagal theory of emotion proposes that the evolution of the autonomic nervous system provides the organizing principle to interpret the adaptive significance of affective processes and provides substrates for emotional experiences and affectives that are necessary for social behavior in mammals.

Parallel circuits mediating distinct emotional coping reactions to different types of stress

Offspring-induced nurturance: animal-human parallels.

  • J. Stern
  • Biology, Psychology
    Developmental psychobiology
  • 1997
Human mothers inadvertently learn to identify their own baby rapidly after birth and can do so via a single sensory modality, so maternal responsiveness and gratification are impaired by inappropriate, insufficient, or nonreciprocal interactions.

Handbook of attachment : theory, research, and clinical applications

Part 1. Overview of Attachment Theory. Cassidy, The Nature of the Child's Ties. Kobak, Madsen, Disruptions in Attachment Bonds: Implications for Theory, Research, and Clinical Intervention. Shaver,

Orienting in a defensive world: mammalian modifications of our evolutionary heritage. A Polyvagal Theory.

The Polyvagal Theory is introduced to explain the different functions of the two primary medullary source nuclei of the vagus and speculates that mammalian, but not reptilian, brainstem organization is characterized by a ventral vagal complex related to processes associated with attention, motion, emotion, and communication.

The social deficits of the oxytocin knockout mouse

The development of transgenic mice with specific deficits in social memory represents a promising approach to examine the cellular and neural systems of social cognition.

Investigating the Physiological Control of Mammalian Vocalizations

A growing appreciation is shown for the value of studying the neural representation and physiological control mechanisms of specific vocalizations in specific mammalian species.