Social Dominance Orientation and John Henryism at the Intersection of Race and Class

Abstract

Three studies were conducted to explore the relationship between social dominance orientation (SDO) and John Henryism (JH). Each study was framed using an intersectionality perspective which predicted that specific combinations of social identities would impact endorsement of SDO and JH in unique ways. We hypothesized that upper-class non-Whites would be higher in SDO and lower in JH than any other class/race identity combination. As predicted, a Class ¥ Race interaction emerged for both SDO and JH in Study 1 (N = 387), with upper-class non-Whites displaying the highest levels of SDO and the lowest levels of JH. Study 2 (N = 340) replicated these findings and also explored the impact of context-level class on SDO and JH. Using a qualitative method, in Study 3 (N = 23) we found that upper-class non-Whites described their social class positions in ways highly consistent with SDO, whereas middle/working-class non-Whites described their experiences in ways consistent with JH.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Sanders2012SocialDO, title={Social Dominance Orientation and John Henryism at the Intersection of Race and Class}, author={Melissa R. Sanders and Ramaswami Mahalingam}, year={2012} }