Social Contexts Influence Ethical Considerations of Research

@article{Gordon2011SocialCI,
  title={Social Contexts Influence Ethical Considerations of Research},
  author={Judith B. Gordon and Robert J. Levine and Carolyn M. Mazure and Philip E. Rubin and Barry R. Schaller and John L. Young},
  journal={The American Journal of Bioethics},
  year={2011},
  volume={11},
  pages={24 - 30}
}
This article argues that we could improve the design of research protocols by developing an awareness of and a responsiveness to the social contexts of all the actors in the research enterprise, including subjects, investigators, sponsors, and members of the community in which the research will be conducted. “Social context” refers to the settings in which the actors are situated, including, but not limited to, their social, economic, political, cultural, and technological features. The utility… Expand
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