Social Complexification and Pig (Sus scrofa) Husbandry in Ancient China: A Combined Geometric Morphometric and Isotopic Approach

@article{Cucchi2016SocialCA,
  title={Social Complexification and Pig (Sus scrofa) Husbandry in Ancient China: A Combined Geometric Morphometric and Isotopic Approach},
  author={Thomas Cucchi and Lingling Dai and Marie Balasse and Chunqing Zhao and Jiangtao Gao and Ya-nan Hu and Jing Yuan and Jean-Denis Vigne},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2016},
  volume={11}
}
Pigs have played a major role in the economic, social and symbolic systems of China since the Early Neolithic more than 8,000 years ago. However, the interaction between the history of pig domestication and transformations in Chinese society since then, have not been fully explored. In this paper, we investigated the co-evolution from the earliest farming communities through to the new political and economic models of state-like societies, up to the Chinese Empire, using 5,000 years of… Expand
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