Snowmobile Activity and Glucocorticoid Stress Responses in Wolves and Elk

@article{Creel2002SnowmobileAA,
  title={Snowmobile Activity and Glucocorticoid Stress Responses in Wolves and Elk},
  author={Scott Creel and Jennifer E. Fox and Amanda Ruth Hardy and Jennifer L. Sands and Bob Garrott and Rolf O. Peterson},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={16}
}
Abstract: The effect of human activities on animal populations is widely debated, particularly since a recent decision by the U.S. Department of the Interior to ban snowmobiles from national parks. Immunoassays of fecal glucocorticoid levels provide a sensitive and noninvasive method of measuring the physiological stress responses of wildlife to disturbances. We tested for associations between snowmobile activity and glucocorticoid levels in an elk (Cervus elaphus) population in Yellowstone… 
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