Snakebite in tropical Australia, Papua New Guinea and Irian Jaya

@article{Currie2000SnakebiteIT,
  title={Snakebite in tropical Australia, Papua New Guinea and Irian Jaya},
  author={B. Currie},
  journal={Emergency Medicine Australasia},
  year={2000},
  volume={12},
  pages={285-294}
}
  • B. Currie
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine
  • Emergency Medicine Australasia
While snakebite numbers are decreasing in temperate Australia, snakebite remains an important cause of morbidity in tropical Australia and of mortality in Papua New Guinea and Irian Jaya. The Australasian elapid snakes have complex mixtures of venom components, with distinct clinical syndromes defined for the potentially lethal species. Life-threatening scenarios are progressive neuromuscular paralysis with taipan (Oxyuranus spp.) and death adder (Acanthophis spp.) envenoming and early… Expand
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