Snake pictures draw more early attention than spider pictures in non-phobic women: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

@article{Strien2014SnakePD,
  title={Snake pictures draw more early attention than spider pictures in non-phobic women: evidence from event-related brain potentials.},
  author={Jan W Van Strien and R Eijlers and Ingmar H. A. Franken and Jorg Huijding},
  journal={Biological psychology},
  year={2014},
  volume={96},
  pages={150-7}
}
Snakes were probably the first predators of mammals and may have been important agents of evolutionary changes in the primate visual system allowing rapid visual detection of fearful stimuli (Isbell, 2006). By means of early and late attention-related brain potentials, we examined the hypothesis that more early visual attention is automatically allocated to snakes than to spiders. To measure the early posterior negativity (EPN), 24 healthy, non-phobic women watched the random rapid serial… CONTINUE READING
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