Snack Food, Satiety, and Weight.

@article{Njike2016SnackFS,
  title={Snack Food, Satiety, and Weight.},
  author={Valentine Y Njike and Teresa M. Smith and Omree Shuval and Kerem Shuval and Ingrid Edshteyn and Vahid Kalantari and Amy Lazarus Yaroch},
  journal={Advances in nutrition},
  year={2016},
  volume={7 5},
  pages={
          866-78
        }
}
In today's society, snacking contributes close to one-third of daily energy intake, with many snacks consisting of energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods. Choices made with regard to snacking are affected by a multitude of factors on individual, social, and environmental levels. Social norms, for example, that emphasize healthful eating are likely to increase the intake of nutrient-rich snacks. In addition, satiety, the feeling of fullness that persists after eating, is an important factor in… CONTINUE READING
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