Smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption in 187 countries, 1980-2012.

@article{Ng2014SmokingPA,
  title={Smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption in 187 countries, 1980-2012.},
  author={Marie Ng and Michael K Freeman and Thomas D. Fleming and Margaret Robinson and Laura Dwyer-Lindgren and Blake Thomson and Alexandra Wollum and Ella Sanman and Sarah K Wulf and Alan D. Lopez and Christopher J. L. Murray and Emmanuela Gakidou},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2014},
  volume={311 2},
  pages={
          183-92
        }
}
IMPORTANCE Tobacco is a leading global disease risk factor. Understanding national trends in prevalence and consumption is critical for prioritizing action and evaluating tobacco control progress. OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of daily smoking by age and sex and the number of cigarettes per smoker per day for 187 countries from 1980 to 2012. DESIGN Nationally representative sources that measured tobacco use (n = 2102 country-years of data) were systematically identified. Survey data… 

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