Smoking during pregnancy and poor antenatal care: two major preventable risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome.

@article{Schlaud1996SmokingDP,
  title={Smoking during pregnancy and poor antenatal care: two major preventable risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome.},
  author={Martin Schlaud and Werner Johann Kleemann and Christian F. Poets and Brigitte Sens},
  journal={International journal of epidemiology},
  year={1996},
  volume={25 5},
  pages={
          959-65
        }
}
BACKGROUND In this case-control study on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the magnitude of the risk factors 'maternal smoking during pregnancy' and 'poor antenatal care' was assessed and the attributable proportions of SIDS incidence estimated. METHODS Perinatal data from 190 SIDS cases, who died between 1986 and 1990 at age > 7 days and had a diagnosis of SIDS confirmed by autopsy, were compared to 5920 controls. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed… 

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