Smart Moves: Effects of Relative Brain Size on Establishment Success of Invasive Amphibians and Reptiles

@inproceedings{Amiel2011SmartME,
  title={Smart Moves: Effects of Relative Brain Size on Establishment Success
                    of Invasive Amphibians and Reptiles},
  author={Joshua Johnstone Amiel and Reid Tingley and Richard Shine},
  booktitle={PloS one},
  year={2011}
}
Brain size relative to body size varies considerably among animals, but the ecological consequences of that variation remain poorly understood. Plausibly, larger brains confer increased behavioural flexibility, and an ability to respond to novel challenges. In keeping with that hypothesis, successful invasive species of birds and mammals that flourish after translocation to a new area tend to have larger brains than do unsuccessful invaders. We found the same pattern in ectothermic terrestrial… CONTINUE READING
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