Smaller colonies and more solitary living mark higher elevation populations of a social spider.

@article{Purcell2007SmallerCA,
  title={Smaller colonies and more solitary living mark higher elevation populations of a social spider.},
  author={J. Purcell and L. Avil{\'e}s},
  journal={The Journal of animal ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={76 3},
  pages={
          590-7
        }
}
1. There appears to be a pattern of decreasing sociality with increasing elevation across social spider species in the genus Anelosimus at tropical latitudes. Our data suggest that this pattern holds within a single species, Anelosimus eximius, on a smaller altitudinal gradient. 2. In comparing colony size at six different altitudes in north-eastern Ecuador, we find that the lowland A. eximius populations tend to have larger colonies and few solitary females. At higher elevations, many of the… Expand
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