Small-male mating advantage in a species of Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatinae: Stenopelmatus)

@inproceedings{Weissman2008SmallmaleMA,
  title={Small-male mating advantage in a species of Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatinae: Stenopelmatus)},
  author={D. B. Weissman and K. A. Judge and Stanley C. Williams and D. Whitman and Vincent F. Lee},
  year={2008}
}
Abstract Scientific literature often touts the many advantages of large body size, but seldom addresses the value of small body size. Yet selection for large size must be counterbalanced by selection for small size, otherwise, all animals would be large. In this paper, we demonstrate female-biased size dimorphism and a strong copulatory advantage for small males in a Jerusalem cricket (JC) (Stenopelmatus) from central California. We selectively paired male and female JCs of diverse body sizes… Expand
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