Small is beautiful: features of the smallest insects and limits to miniaturization.

@article{Polilov2015SmallIB,
  title={Small is beautiful: features of the smallest insects and limits to miniaturization.},
  author={A. Polilov},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2015},
  volume={60},
  pages={
          103-21
        }
}
  • A. Polilov
  • Published 2015
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of entomology
  • Miniaturization leads to considerable reorganization of structures in insects, affecting almost all organs and tissues. In the smallest insects, comparable in size to unicellular organisms, modifications arise not only at the level of organs, but also at the cellular level. Miniaturization is accompanied by allometric changes in many organ systems. The consequences of miniaturization displayed by different insect taxa include both common and unique changes. Because the smallest insects are… CONTINUE READING
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