Small-Scale Fragmentation Effects on Local Genetic Diversity in Two Phyllostomid Bats with Different Dispersal Abilities in Panama

@article{Meyer2009SmallScaleFE,
  title={Small-Scale Fragmentation Effects on Local Genetic Diversity in Two Phyllostomid Bats with Different Dispersal Abilities in Panama},
  author={Christoph F. J. Meyer and Elisabeth Klara Viktoria Kalko and Gerald Kerth},
  journal={Biotropica},
  year={2009},
  volume={41},
  pages={95-102}
}
Habitat fragmentation is one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. Despite their importance for conservation, the genetic consequences of small-scale habitat fragmentation for bat populations are largely unknown. In this study, we linked genetic with ecological and demographic data to assess the effects of habitat fragmentation on two species of phyllostomid bats (Uroderma bilobatum and Carollia perspicillata) that differ in their dispersal abilities and demographic response to fragmentation… Expand

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