Small But Extremely Tough

@article{Tanner2012SmallBE,
  title={Small But Extremely Tough},
  author={K. Tanner},
  journal={Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={336},
  pages={1237 - 1238}
}
  • K. Tanner
  • Published 2012
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
The extreme strength and toughness of a natural material from a marine shrimp can be explained by its intricate layered structure. Anyone interested in keeping the stomatopod Odontodactylus scyllarus (1), commonly known as the peacock or harlequin mantis shrimp (see the first figure), will soon discover that these crustaceans should not be kept in glass aquaria. The force generated with the dactyl club—a 5-mm-wide appendage used by the shrimp to smash the shells of their prey—can reach 500 N… Expand

Topics from this paper

Biomimetic Hard Materials
Biogenic Hydroxyapatite: A New Material for the Preservation and Restoration of the Built Environment.
Bioinspired structural materials.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 10 REFERENCES
Toughening through nature-adapted nanoscale design.