Slow subcutaneous infusion of flumazenil for the treatment of long-term, high-dose benzodiazepine users: a review of 214 cases

@article{Faccini2016SlowSI,
  title={Slow subcutaneous infusion of flumazenil for the treatment of long-term, high-dose benzodiazepine users: a review of 214 cases},
  author={Marco Faccini and Roberto Leone and Sibilla Opri and Rebecca Casari and Chiara Resentera and Laura Morbioli and Anita Conforti and Fabio Lugoboni},
  journal={Journal of Psychopharmacology},
  year={2016},
  volume={30},
  pages={1047 - 1053}
}
Despite the first reports concerning benzodiazepine dependence being published in the early 1960s literature, the risk of benzodiazepine addiction is still greatly debated. The severe discomfort and life threatening complications usually experienced by long-term benzodiazepine users who suddenly interrupt benzodiazepine intake have led to the development of several detoxification protocols. A successful strategy used by our Addiction Unit is abrupt benzodiazepine cessation by administering… Expand
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Withdrawal and psychological sequelae, and patient satisfaction associated with subcutaneous flumazenil infusion for the management of benzodiazepine withdrawal: a case series
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It is indicated that subcutaneous flumazenil infusion has excellent tolerability, efficacy and improvement on measures of psychological distress and may prove a significant asset in the management of benzodiazepine withdrawal. Expand
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