Slow progress in rational-emotive therapy outcome research: Etiology and treatment

@article{Haaga1989SlowPI,
  title={Slow progress in rational-emotive therapy outcome research: Etiology and treatment},
  author={David A. F. Haaga and Gerald C. Davison},
  journal={Cognitive Therapy and Research},
  year={1989},
  volume={13},
  pages={493-508}
}
It has been observed that outcome research has had limited impact on rational-emotive therapy (RET) theory and practice. This paper argues that slow progress in this area has resulted in part from ambiguities in the definition and measurement of RET interventions and of irrational beliefs. Also, advances in treatment outcome research methodology, such as calculation of the clinical significance of therapy effects, have not been incorporated. Finally, there has been little research on some… CONTINUE READING
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