Slow echo: facial EMG evidence for the delay of spontaneous, but not voluntary, emotional mimicry in children with autism spectrum disorders.

@article{Oberman2009SlowEF,
  title={Slow echo: facial EMG evidence for the delay of spontaneous, but not voluntary, emotional mimicry in children with autism spectrum disorders.},
  author={Lindsay M. Oberman and Piotr Winkielman and Vilayanur S. Ramachandran},
  journal={Developmental science},
  year={2009},
  volume={12 4},
  pages={
          510-20
        }
}
Spontaneous mimicry, including that of emotional facial expressions, is important for socio-emotional skills such as empathy and communication. Those skills are often impacted in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Successful mimicry requires not only the activation of the response, but also its appropriate speed. Yet, previous studies examined ASD differences in only response magnitude. The current study investigated timing and magnitude of spontaneous and voluntary mimicry in ASD children and… Expand
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