Slow aging in mammals-Lessons from African mole-rats and bats.

@article{Dammann2017SlowAI,
  title={Slow aging in mammals-Lessons from African mole-rats and bats.},
  author={P. Dammann},
  journal={Seminars in cell \& developmental biology},
  year={2017},
  volume={70},
  pages={
          154-163
        }
}
  • P. Dammann
  • Published 2017
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Seminars in cell & developmental biology
Traditionally, the main mammalian models used in aging research have been mice and rats, i.e. short-lived species that obviously lack effective maintenance mechanisms to keep their soma in a functional state for prolonged periods of time. It is doubtful that life-extending mechanisms identified only in such short-lived species adequately reflect the diversity of longevity pathways that have naturally evolved in mammals, or that they have much relevance for long-lived species such as humans… Expand
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