Slow Technology – Designing for Reflection

@article{Hallns2001SlowT,
  title={Slow Technology – Designing for Reflection},
  author={L. Halln{\"a}s and Johan Redstr{\"o}m},
  journal={Personal and Ubiquitous Computing},
  year={2001},
  volume={5},
  pages={201-212}
}
  • L. Hallnäs, Johan Redström
  • Published 2001
  • Computer Science
  • Personal and Ubiquitous Computing
  • Abstract: As computers are increasingly woven into the fabric of everyday life, interaction design may have to change – from creating only fast and efficient tools to be used during a limited time in specific situations, to creating technology that surrounds us and therefore is a part of our activities for long periods of time. We present slow technology: a design agenda for technology aimed at reflection and moments of mental rest rather than efficiency in performance. The aim of this paper is… CONTINUE READING
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