Sleep in fall/winter seasonal affective disorder: effects of light and changing seasons.

@article{Anderson1994SleepIF,
  title={Sleep in fall/winter seasonal affective disorder: effects of light and changing seasons.},
  author={Jane L. Anderson and Lynne N Rosen and Wallace B. Mendelson and Frederick M. Jacobsen and R G Skwerer and J R Joseph-Vanderpool and Connie C. Duncan and Thomas A. Wehr and Norman Edward Rosenthal},
  journal={Journal of psychosomatic research},
  year={1994},
  volume={38 4},
  pages={323-37}
}
Disturbances of sleep are a hallmark of seasonal affective disorders (SAD), as they are of other mood disorders. Fall/winter SAD patients most often report hypersomnia. Among responses of 293 SAD patients on a symptom questionnaire, complaints of winter hypersomnia (80%) greatly exceeded insomnia (10%), hypersomnia plus insomnia (5%), or no sleep difficulty (5%). Increased sleep length in fall/winter is not unique to SAD. Among 1571 individuals across four latitudes surveyed at random from the… CONTINUE READING

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