Corpus ID: 11121313

Sleep environment and the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in an urban population: the Chicago Infant Mortality Study.

@article{Hauck2003SleepEA,
  title={Sleep environment and the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in an urban population: the Chicago Infant Mortality Study.},
  author={Fern R. Hauck and Stanislaw M Herman and M Donovan and Solomon Iyasu and Cathryn Merrick Moore and Edmund R. Donoghue and Robert H. Kirschner and Marian Willinger},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2003},
  volume={111 5 Pt 2},
  pages={
          1207-14
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To examine risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) with the goal of reducing SIDS mortality among blacks, which continues to affect this group at twice the rate of whites. METHODS We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study of 260 SIDS deaths that occurred in Chicago between 1993 and 1996 and an equal number of matched living controls to determine the association between SIDS and factors in the sleep environment and other variables related to infant care… Expand
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