Sleep-dependent learning and motor-skill complexity.

@article{Kuriyama2004SleepdependentLA,
  title={Sleep-dependent learning and motor-skill complexity.},
  author={Kenichi Kuriyama and Robert Stickgold and Matthew P. Walker},
  journal={Learning \& memory},
  year={2004},
  volume={11 6},
  pages={
          705-13
        }
}
Learning of a procedural motor-skill task is known to progress through a series of unique memory stages. Performance initially improves during training, and continues to improve, without further rehearsal, across subsequent periods of sleep. Here, we investigate how this delayed sleep-dependent learning is affected when the task characteristics are varied across several degrees of difficulty, and whether this improvement differentially enhances individual transitions of the motor-sequence… 

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