Sleep and synaptic homeostasis: a hypothesis

@article{Tononi2003SleepAS,
  title={Sleep and synaptic homeostasis: a hypothesis},
  author={G. Tononi and C. Cirelli},
  journal={Brain Research Bulletin},
  year={2003},
  volume={62},
  pages={143-150}
}
During much of sleep, the cerebral cortex is rippled by slow waves, which appear in the electroencephalogram as oscillations between 0.5 and 4.5 Hz. Slow waves are regulated as a function of previous wakefulness, being maximal at the beginning of sleep and then progressively returning to a baseline level. This paper discusses a hypothesis about the significance of slow-wave activity and its homeostatic regulation. The hypothesis is as follows: 1. Wakefulness is associated with synaptic… Expand
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Sleep medicine
  • 2005
TLDR
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TLDR
Based on the ultrastructural and molecular evidence from these two studies, it is convincing that sleep mainly functions in synaptic homeostasis and the functions of sleep are not limited to this process. Expand
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