Sleep and menopause: a narrative review

@article{Shaver2015SleepAM,
  title={Sleep and menopause: a narrative review},
  author={Joan L. F. Shaver and Nancy Fugate Woods},
  journal={Menopause},
  year={2015},
  volume={22},
  pages={899–915}
}
ObjectiveOur overall aim—through a narrative review—is to critically profile key extant evidence of menopause-related sleep, mostly from studies published in the last decade. MethodsWe searched the database PubMed using selected Medical Subject Headings for sleep and menopause (n = 588 articles). Using similar headings, we also searched the Cochrane Library (n = 1), Embase (n = 449), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (n = 163), Web of Science (n = 506), and PsycINFO (n… 

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Influence of lifestyle on postmenopausal women’s sleep

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Management of sleep disorders in the menopausal transition

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