Sleep Loss and Temporal Memory

@article{Harrison2000SleepLA,
  title={Sleep Loss and Temporal Memory},
  author={Yvonne Harrison and James A. Horne},
  journal={Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology},
  year={2000},
  volume={53},
  pages={271 - 279}
}
  • Y. Harrison, J. Horne
  • Published 1 February 2000
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Historical evidence suggests that sleep deprivation affects temporal memory, but this has not been studied systematically. We explored the effects of 36 hr of sleep deprivation on a neuropsychological test of temporal memory. To promote optimal performance, the test was short, novel, and interesting, and caffeine was used to reduce “sleepiness”. A total of 40 young adults were randomized into four groups: control + caffeine (Cc), control + placebo (Cp), sleep deprived + caffeine (SDc), and… 
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The results suggest that sleep deprivation degrades the quality of information stored in memory and that this may occur through degraded attentional processes.
Sleep Deprivation Impairs Binding of Information with Its Context.
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Does hormone therapy affect attention and memory in sleep-deprived women?
Objectives To evaluate whether hormone therapy (HT) modifies cognitive performance during sleep deprivation in postmenopausal women. Comparison was made with a group of young women. Methods
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