Sleep Disruption Secondary to Overnight Call Shifts Is Associated With Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Residents: A Cross-Sectional Study

Abstract

Objectives:Sleep disruption has been associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We hypothesized that residents with greater sleep disruption secondary to intermittent overnight call shifts would have a higher prevalence of IBS.Methods:Postgraduate residents completed a Web-based survey including demographic data, frequency and characteristics of call shifts, the Rome III questionnaire, and the IBS–quality of life measure.Results:For every hour of sleep deprivation while on call vs. off call, the odds ratio for an increased likelihood of IBS was 1.32, after adjustment for age and gender. The mean number of calls per block, sleep deprivation while on call, and specialty program vs. family practice each predicted the severity of IBS.Conclusions:Sleep disruption secondary to overnight call in residents was associated with an increased prevalence of IBS.

DOI: 10.1038/ajg.2011.486

Cite this paper

@article{Wells2012SleepDS, title={Sleep Disruption Secondary to Overnight Call Shifts Is Associated With Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Residents: A Cross-Sectional Study}, author={Malcolm M. Wells and Lee S. Roth and Nilesh Chande}, journal={The American Journal of Gastroenterology}, year={2012}, volume={107}, pages={1151-1156} }