Skull Shape, Masticatory Apparatus, and Diet of Vassallia and Holmesina (Mammalia: Xenarthra: Pampatheriidae): When Anatomy Constrains Destiny

@article{Vizcano2004SkullSM,
  title={Skull Shape, Masticatory Apparatus, and Diet of Vassallia and Holmesina (Mammalia: Xenarthra: Pampatheriidae): When Anatomy Constrains Destiny},
  author={Sergio F. Vizca{\'i}no and Gerardo De Iuliis and Mar{\'i}a Susana Bargo},
  journal={Journal of Mammalian Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={291-322}
}
The form and function of the masticatory apparatus of the fossil genera Vassallia and Holmesina are analyzed so that the possible dietary behaviors of these pampathere xenarthrans might be inferred. Analysis is based on comparisons of dental morphology and skeletal features (through RFTRA) associated with the masticatory musculature among the pampatheres, the extant dasypodids Euphractus and Dasypus, and the glyptodont Propalaeohoplophorus. A method is proposed for generating a moment arm of… Expand
The teeth of the “toothless”: novelties and key innovations in the evolution of xenarthrans (Mammalia, Xenarthra)
TLDR
The combination of tooth features that characterize xenarthrans might be seen as the key innovation for the ecologic diversity developed at least since the Oligocene, breaking the mold of the tribosphenic condition that constrained the evolution of the other major clades of mammals. Expand
An Approach to the Biomechanics of the Masticatory Apparatus of Early Miocene (Santacrucian Age) South American Ungulates (Astrapotheria, Litopterna, and Notoungulata): Moment Arm Estimation Based on 3D Landmarks
TLDR
The results indicate that, except for Pachyrukhos, in no Santacrucian ungulate does the masseter muscle have greater mechanical advantage than the temporalis, and notoungulates have a better configuration to develop force on the molar tooth row than litopterns, consistent with recent ecomorphological approaches applied to this fauna. Expand
Morphology and function of the hyoid apparatus of fossil xenarthrans (mammalia)
TLDR
The rigidity of the apparatus suggests limited tongue protrusion, but the tongue, in glyptodonts at least, was a powerful structure important for intraoral manipulation of food. Expand
Evidence for advanced carnivory in fossil armadillos (Mammalia: Xenarthra: Dasypodidae)
TLDR
The features suggest that Macroeuphractus occupied an extreme position in the carnivorous-omnivorous feeding behavior of euphractines, and its large size indicates that it could have easily preyed on hare-sized vertebrates. Expand
Jaw biomechanics in the South American aetosaur Neoaetosauroides engaeus
TLDR
The function of the jaw apparatus and the possible dietary habits of the aetosaur Neoaetosauroides engaeus from the Triassic of South America were analyzed in comparison with Northern Hemisphere aetosaurs and the living short-snouted crocodile Alligator mississippiensis. Expand
Tooth Root Size, Chewing Muscle Leverage, and the Biology of Homunculus patagonicus (Primates) from the Late Early Miocene of Patagonia
TLDR
From muscle scars on the skull, the mechanical leverage of the chewing muscles at bite points from the canine to the last molar is estimated and Homunculus patagonicus has large postcanine roots relative to body size and poor masticatory leverage compared to the extant platyrrhines in the authors' sample. Expand
Rediscovered Cranial Material of Venaticosuchus rusconii Enables the First Jaw Biomechanics in Ornithosuchidae (Archosauria: Pseudosuchia)
TLDR
The study of the three species of ornithosuchids revealed greater similarities between ornithOSuchids and aetosaurs, in spite of their different feeding habits, than between ornithsosuchid and crocodylians. Expand
Morphological characterization and sex-related differences of the mandible of the armadillos Chaetophractus vellerosus and Zaedyus pichiy (Xenarthra, Dasypodidae), with consideration of dietary aspects
TLDR
The morphological characteristics of the mandible of adult Chaetophractus vellerosus and Zaedyus pichiy were studied to establish its generalized design and to identify inter- and intra- (sexual) specific differences. Expand
Jaw myology and bite force of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes)
TLDR
The jaw musculature of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) is analysed to enable future studies aimed at understanding craniofacial development, morphology, function and evolution to estimate bite force based on muscle dissections, physiological cross‐sectional area and skull biomechanical modelling. Expand
Dental occlusal surface area in relation to body mass, food habits and other biological features in fossil xenarthrans
Abstract. The Xenarthra includes the most intriguing mammals from the Cenozoic of South America: the glyptodonts (Cingulata) and the ground sloths (Tardigrada). Their masticatory apparatuses areExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 40 REFERENCES
The masticatory apparatus of the armadillo Eutatus (Mammalia, Cingulata) and some allied genera
TLDR
The analysis of the masticatory apparatus of the eutatines allows us to state that Eutatus and Proeutatus exhibit the most specialized morphology known for an herbivore with an armadillo-like skull pattern. Expand
The anatomy and function of the feeding apparatus in two armadillos (Dasypoda): anatomy is not destiny
TLDR
The morphology and function of the masticatory apparatus in two armadillos, Dasypus novemcinctus and Euphractus sexcinctus are compared to highlight the difficulties in predicting diet from morphological analysis and raise questions concerning the behavioural limits imposed by morphological specialization. Expand
Masticatory musculature of Asian taeniolabidoid multituberculate mammals
TLDR
Five new multituberculate autapomorphies are recognized: anterior and intermediate zygomatic ridges: glenoid fossa large, flat and sloping backwards (forwards in rodents), arranged anterolateral and standing out from the braincase; semicircular posterior margin of the dentary with condylar process forming at least a part of it; anterior position of the coronoid process; and anterior positionof the masseteric fossa. Expand
Biomechanics of the jaw apparatus of the gigantic Eocene bird Diatryma: implications for diet and mode of life
Discovery of several new specimens of the gigantic Eocene ground bird Diatryma gigantea from the Willwood Formation of northwestern Wyoming, has prompted an analysis of its feeding apparatus and anExpand
The ear region of edentates and the phylogeny of the Tardigrada (Mammalia, Xenarthra)
TLDR
A cladistic investigation of the phylogenetic relationships among 21 extinct and extant genera of sloths was performed on the basis of characteristics of the bony anatomy of the auditory region in order to evaluate specific hypotheses of relationship within the group. Expand
Pampatherium Paulacoutoi, uma nova espécie de tatu gigante da Bahia, Brasil (Ledentata, Dasypodidae)
TLDR
In this study, special emphasis is given to the cranium of the giant armadillo vohich and a comparative study of related species, especially Pampatherium humboldti (Lund), 1839, is made. Expand
On The Measurement of Morphology and its Change
TLDR
This review is concerned with quantitative comparisons of biological shape wherein some parts of specimens obviously have changed and others parts have not. Expand
The Social Organisation of Antelope in Relation To Their Ecology
TLDR
The paper describes different feeding styles among antelope, in terms of selection of food items and coverage of home ranges, and argues that these feeding styles bear a relationship to maximum group size of feeding animals through the influence of dispersion ofFood items upon group cohesion. Expand
The Fossil Mammal Fauna of South America
Of the three southern continents, South America was more isolated during the Tertiary than Africa, less isolated than Australia. Its record of Cenozoic mammalian life is better than that of either.Expand
The Mammalian Skull
TLDR
The Craniogenic elements: Head mesoderm, endoskeletal skull, and functional Adaptations of the Skull in Modern Eutherians. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...