Skin friction on a moving wall and its implications for swimming animals

@article{Ehrenstein2013SkinFO,
  title={Skin friction on a moving wall and its implications for swimming animals},
  author={Uwe Ehrenstein and Christophe Eloy},
  journal={Journal of Fluid Mechanics},
  year={2013},
  volume={718},
  pages={321 - 346}
}
Abstract Estimating the energetic costs of undulatory swimming is important for biologists and engineers alike. To calculate these costs it is crucial to evaluate the drag forces originating from skin friction. This topic has been controversial for decades, some claiming that animals use ingenious mechanisms to reduce the drag and others hypothesizing that undulatory swimming motions induce a drag increase because of the compression of the boundary layers. In this paper, we examine this latter… 
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