Skin Wrinkling: Can Food Make a Difference?

@article{Purba2001SkinWC,
  title={Skin Wrinkling: Can Food Make a Difference?},
  author={M. Purba and A. Kouris-Blazos and N. Wattanapenpaiboon and W. Lukito and E. Rothenberg and B. Steen and M. Wahlqvist},
  journal={Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
  year={2001},
  volume={20},
  pages={71 - 80}
}
OBJECTIVES This study addressed whether food and nutrient intakes were correlated with skin wrinkling in a sun-exposed site. [...] Key Method Food and nutrient intakes were assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Skin wrinkling was measured using a cutaneous microtopographic method. RESULTS SWE elderly had the least skin wrinkling in a sun-exposed site, followed by GRM, GRG and ACA. Correlation analyses on the pooled data and using the major food groups suggested…Expand
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