Skin‐sensitizing and irritant properties of propylene glycol

@article{Lessmann2005SkinsensitizingAI,
  title={Skin‐sensitizing and irritant properties of propylene glycol},
  author={Holger Lessmann and Axel Schnuch and Johannes Geier and Wolfgang Uter},
  journal={Contact Dermatitis},
  year={2005},
  volume={53}
}
In the several publications reviewed in this article, propylene glycol (PG; 1,2‐propylene glycol) is described as a very weak contact sensitizer, if at all. However, particular exposures to PG‐containing products might be associated with an elevated risk of sensitization. To identify such exposures, we analysed patch test data of 45 138 patients who have been tested with 20% PG in water between 1992 and 2002. Out of these, 1044 patients (2.3%) tested positively, 1083 showed a doubtful… Expand
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