Skeletons of terrestrial cetaceans and the relationship of whales to artiodactyls

@article{Thewissen2001SkeletonsOT,
  title={Skeletons of terrestrial cetaceans and the relationship of whales to artiodactyls},
  author={J. G. Thewissen and E. Williams and L. Roe and S. Hussain},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2001},
  volume={413},
  pages={277-281}
}
  • J. G. Thewissen, E. Williams, +1 author S. Hussain
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature
  • Modern members of the mammalian order Cetacea (whales, dolphins and porpoises) are obligate aquatic swimmers that are highly distinctive in morphology, lacking hair and hind limbs, and having flippers, flukes, and a streamlined body. Eocene fossils document much of cetaceans' land-to-water transition, but, until now, the most primitive representative for which a skeleton was known was clearly amphibious and lived in coastal environments. Here we report on the skeletons of two early Eocene… CONTINUE READING
    249 Citations

    Figures and Topics from this paper.

    A complete phylogeny of the whales, dolphins and even‐toed hoofed mammals (Cetartiodactyla)
    • 223
    • PDF
    THE POSTCRANIAL SKELETON OF EARLY EOCENE PAKICETID CETACEANS
    • 50
    • Highly Influenced
    Impact of increased character sampling on the phylogeny of Cetartiodactyla (Mammalia): combined analysis including fossils
    • 115
    • Highly Influenced
    • PDF
    Mitogenomic analyses provide new insights into cetacean origin and evolution.
    • 145
    • PDF

    References

    SHOWING 1-10 OF 65 REFERENCES
    A new Eocene archaeocete (Mammalia, Cetacea) from India and the time of origin of whales.
    • S. Bajpai, P. Gingerich
    • Medicine, Biology
    • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
    • 1998
    • 133
    • PDF
    Whale ankles and evolutionary relationships
    • 29