Skeletal muscle atrophy during short-term disuse: Implications for age-related sarcopenia

@article{Wall2013SkeletalMA,
  title={Skeletal muscle atrophy during short-term disuse: Implications for age-related sarcopenia},
  author={Benjamin Toby Wall and Marlou L. Dirks and Luc J.C. van Loon},
  journal={Ageing Research Reviews},
  year={2013},
  volume={12},
  pages={898-906}
}
Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy and the Rehabilitative Role of Protein in Recovery from Musculoskeletal Injury.
TLDR
Mechanisms of skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and recent advances delineating the role of protein intake as a potential countermeasure are explored.
A reduced activity model: a relevant tool for the study of ageing muscle
TLDR
This step-reduction model may be more relevant than total bed rest or limb immobilisation for examining real-world scenarios that present a physiological challenge to the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass in older individuals.
Interventional strategies to combat muscle disuse atrophy in humans: focus on neuromuscular electrical stimulation and dietary protein.
TLDR
Effective interventional strategies to prevent or alleviate muscle disuse atrophy should include both exercise (mimetics) and appropriate nutritional support, which likely increases the capacity to preserve skeletal muscle mass during a period of disuse.
Loss of mitochondrial energetics is associated with poor recovery of muscle function but not mass following disuse atrophy
TLDR
Early mitochondrial remodeling affects muscle function but not mass during disuse atrophy, and alterations in mitochondrial energetics and lipid remodeling may represent novel targets to prevent muscle functional impairment caused by disuse and to enhance recovery from periods of muscle atrophy.
Disuse impairs the muscle protein synthetic response to protein ingestion in healthy men.
TLDR
A short period of muscle disuse impairs the muscle protein synthetic response to dietary protein intake in vivo in healthy young men, and anabolic resistance to protein ingestion contributes significantly to the loss of muscle mass observed during disuse.
Strategies to maintain skeletal muscle mass in the injured athlete: Nutritional considerations and exercise mimetics
TLDR
Current recommendations for practitioners aiming to limit the loss of muscle mass and/or strength following injury in their athletes are outlined herein.
Short-term muscle disuse lowers myofibrillar protein synthesis rates and induces anabolic resistance to protein ingestion.
TLDR
It is concluded that 5 days of muscle disuse substantially lowers postabsorptive myofibrillar protein synthesis rates and induces anabolic resistance to protein ingestion.
Skeletal muscle disuse atrophy is not attenuated by dietary protein supplementation in healthy older men.
TLDR
Dietary protein supplementation (∼20 g twice daily) does not attenuate muscle loss during short-term muscle disuse in healthy older men.
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