Skeletal muscle adaptation: training twice every second day vs. training once daily.

@article{Hansen2005SkeletalMA,
  title={Skeletal muscle adaptation: training twice every second day vs. training once daily.},
  author={Anne K G Hansen and Christian Philip Fischer and Peter Plomgaard and Jesper L{\o}vind Andersen and Bengt Saltin and Bente Klarlund Pedersen},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={98 1},
  pages={
          93-9
        }
}
Low muscle glycogen content has been demonstrated to enhance transcription of a number of genes involved in training adaptation. These results made us speculate that training at a low muscle glycogen content would enhance training adaptation. We therefore performed a study in which seven healthy untrained men performed knee extensor exercise with one leg trained in a low-glycogen (Low) protocol and the other leg trained at a high-glycogen (High) protocol. Both legs were trained equally… 

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