Skeletal indicators of locomotor adaptations in living and extinct rodents

@article{Samuels2008SkeletalIO,
  title={Skeletal indicators of locomotor adaptations in living and extinct rodents},
  author={Joshua X. Samuels and Blaire Van Valkenburgh},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2008},
  volume={269}
}
Living rodents show great diversity in their locomotor habits, including semiaquatic, arboreal, fossorial, ricochetal, and gliding species from multiple families. To assess the association between limb morphology and locomotor habits, the appendicular skeletons of 65 rodent genera from 16 families were measured. Ecomorphological analyses of various locomotor types revealed consistent differences in postcranial skeletal morphology that relate to functionally important traits. Behaviorally… 
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