Skeletal density and growth form of corals

@article{Hughes1987SkeletalDA,
  title={Skeletal density and growth form of corals},
  author={Terry P. Hughes},
  journal={Marine Ecology Progress Series},
  year={1987},
  volume={35},
  pages={259-266}
}
  • T. Hughes
  • Published 5 February 1987
  • Geography
  • Marine Ecology Progress Series
This paper explores inter-specific variation in the density of coral skeletons. [] Key Result Although the total number of species examined so far is still small, the review reveals a consistent pattern of skeletal density among different morphological groups of corals. The most porous corals are massive or bushy. Delicate foliaceous corals are the most dense. Tall branching corals exhibit a marked axial gradient in density, i.e. growing tips are very porous while basal regions are extremely dense.

Skeletal extension and calcification of reef-building corals in the central Indian Ocean.

Variability in skeletal bulk densities of common hard corals in Southeast Asia

It is suggested that environmental conditions at local scales play important roles in affecting coral skeletal density and provide an indication of the relative vulnerability among taxa and locations to physical disturbances.

Differences in Growth and Calcification Rates in the Reef-Building Coral Porites lobata: The Implications of Morphotype and Gender on Coral Growth

Comparisons of morphotypes of the common reef-building coral Porites lobata reveal that P. lobata develops different morphologies to allow it to maintain coral species population, characteristics that enhance the species possibility to further its distribution across the reef-framework.

Use of skeletal Sr/Ca ratios to determine growth patterns in a branching coral Isopora palifera

This approach provides a robust method for assessing changes in growth for a common Indo-Pacific branching coral, and provides a valuable framework for quantifying past and future changes in skeletal growth in response to climate change.

Allometric growth in reef-building corals

It is shown that coral growth rates are best predicted from colony size and morphology rather than species, which simplifies the task of projecting community responses to disturbance and climate change.

SPATIAL, TEMPORAL AND TAXONOMIC VARIATION IN CORAL GROWTH-IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEMS

The purpose of this review is to compile extensive data on the growth of corals, to relate disparate methods of measuring coral growth, and to explore spatial, temporal, and taxonomic variation in growth rates.

Computerized tomography and skeletal density of coral skeletons

In this paper I describe and discuss the use of medical X-ray computerized tomography (CT) in the study of coral skeletons. CT generates X-ray images along freely chosen sections through the skeleton
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