Size matters when three-spined sticklebacks go to school

@article{Ranta1992SizeMW,
  title={Size matters when three-spined sticklebacks go to school},
  author={Esa Ranta and Kai Lindstr{\"o}m and Nina Peuhkuri},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1992},
  volume={43},
  pages={160-162}
}
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References

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Assortative schooling in three-spined sticklebacks?
TLDR
It is suggested that, when schooling, it pays for small sticklebacks to group with small fish, as well as a large stickleback, which seems to do better in association with smaller fish than in schools of uniformly large fish.
The adaptive significance of schooling as an anti-predator defense in fish
TLDR
Schooling may not be an equally appropriate defence against all predators and the phylogenetic origins of populations or species can lead to additional genetic constraints, so behavioural ecologists will increasingly focus on how interactions between such con straints govern the evolution of behaviour.
Oddity and the ‘confusion effect’ in predation
SCHOOLING BEHAVIOR IN THE GUPPY (POECILIA RETICULATA): AN EVOLUTIONARY RESPONSE TO PREDATION
  • B. Seghers
  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1974
TLDR
This report presents a new source of evidence favoring an antipredator role for schooling in guppies from natural populations of a small tropical freshwater fish, the guppy, in the Northern Range Mountains of Trinidad, West Indies.
Some Aspects of the Schooling Behaviour of Fish
TLDR
A hypothesis on the nature of the schooling behaviour of fish based on an ethological investigation of schooling is presented, suggesting that with increasing reproductive motivation male Gasterosteus cease schooling and try to hold territories and Females disperse to a limited extent.